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Federal law confronts ongoing creditor harassment, protects you

It is getting on your nerves, causing additional stress to what you are already experiencing as you cope with extreme debt. You know that you have financial troubles, and you are working on resolving them as you take a step closer to filing for bankruptcy. However, you do not need to by continuously reminded by overly aggressive, borderline obnoxious and, yes, law-breaking creditors.

The constant calls at home and work, reminding you that you owe them money, are unwanted. Not only are the creditors bothering you, but they are also harassing your relatives, trying to dig up dirt on you and hurl more threats your way. But you are protected from this behavior. Laws exist that shield you from such creditors, so you can focus your energy on tackling personal financial issues.

Cannot contact employer and family

When confronted by pushy, quota-driven creditors, you must look out for yourself by maintaining a cool disposition. At the same time, seek verification of the debt in question, while keeping thorough records of these creditor encounters to support any potential future legal claims.

Many people exposed to such creditor bullying do not realize that federal law protects them from this behavior. The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) protects consumers from creditor harassment, while also prohibiting specific behaviors subscribed by debt collectors.

Here are some key FDCPA takeaways that makes it illegal for creditors to:

  • Demand you pay more than you owe
  • Insert extra payments that are not part of the original loan or credit agreement
  • Reach out to your workplace/employer, seeking information from supervisors and colleagues
  • Contact family members and relatives
  • Contact you before 8 a.m. and after 9 p.m.
  • Constantly contact you during all hours of the day
  • Use threatening, vulgar and bullying tactics when contacting you
  • Threaten to have you arrested, fired from your job as well as claiming you will lose child custody and welfare benefits.

You should send a letter to creditors, insisting that they cease all communication with you. And a bankruptcy declaration also should finally put an end to such harassment.

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